Why is number four represented by “IIII" instead of "IV" on RAYMOND WEIL watches?
Under Louis 14 (XIIII), Roman number 4 was spelt IIII. Hence the actual use which is in fact the oldest one. It was later changed to a subtractive form (IV) - or common form - to avoid any confusion between Louis XIII and Louis XIIII coins (Louis XIV being easily distinguishable from Louis XIII).
Reasons why IIII remained in use in the watchmaking industry: Balances VIII and constitues tree groups of 4 numbers: 
·   Using I => I, II, III, IIII
·   Using V => V, VI, VII, VIII
·   Using X => IX, X, XI, XII
On a religious side, the division reminds of the father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.
· Ensures a balance of 14 numbers on each side of the 12-6 o’clock axis. On a traditional dial, this axis starts between the X and the II of number XII and ends between the V and the I of number VI, thus gathering together 14 numbers in delimited zones. High-res

Why is number four represented by “IIII" instead of "IV" on RAYMOND WEIL watches?

Under Louis 14 (XIIII), Roman number 4 was spelt IIII. Hence the actual use which is in fact the oldest one. It was later changed to a subtractive form (IV) - or common form - to avoid any confusion between Louis XIII and Louis XIIII coins (Louis XIV being easily distinguishable from Louis XIII).

Reasons why IIII remained in use in the watchmaking industry: Balances VIII and constitues tree groups of 4 numbers:

·   Using I => I, II, III, IIII

·   Using V => V, VI, VII, VIII

·   Using X => IX, X, XI, XII


On a religious side, the division reminds of the father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.

· Ensures a balance of 14 numbers on each side of the 12-6 o’clock axis. On a traditional dial, this axis starts between the X and the II of number XII and ends between the V and the I of number VI, thus gathering together 14 numbers in delimited zones.

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